Study reveals carbon footprint during European kraft paper production reduced by 17%

20 July 2015 (Last Updated July 20th, 2015 18:30)

A study by Swedish research institute Innventia has revealed that the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions caused during the production of European kraft paper has significantly reduced by 17% between 2007 and 2012.

A study by Swedish research institute Innventia has revealed that the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions caused during the production of European kraft paper has significantly reduced by 17% between 2007 and 2012.

Figures released by the study show that CO2 equivalent (CO2e) gas emissions when producing one tonne of average European kraft paper reduced from 570kg to 471kg.

Close to 95,000t of CO2e were saved annually, when results for 2007 were compared with those for 2012.

"The carbon footprint during different stages of production, from the cradle to the factory gate, were reduced from 118g CO2e to 99g CO2e."

Around 60% of the total carbon footprint for each individual paper sack is emitted during kraft paper production.

The carbon footprint during different stages of production, from the cradle to the factory gate, were reduced from 118g CO2e to 99g CO2e.

This resulted in an improvement of 16%, which, among other factors, is due to the reduced weight of each individual sack by using paper with improved quality.

The emissions avoided due to recovery and waste management activities reduces the carbon footprint for each average European paper sack to 70g CO2e from 99g CO2e).

The reduction in carbon footprint is a result of European kraft paper and paper sack industry's continuing efforts to constantly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, improve energy efficiency and increase the share of renewable energies to reach the goals of the EU's climate action plan for 2020.