FDA considers new warning labels for liquid nicotine products

1 July 2015 (Last Updated July 1st, 2015 18:30)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is contemplating plans to impose new warning labels and child-resistant packaging for products containing liquid nicotine, such as bottled e-liquids.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is contemplating plans to impose new warning labels and child-resistant packaging for products containing liquid nicotine, such as bottled e-liquids.

Through an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), FDA is seeking comments or other information about what actions it must take regarding nicotine exposure warnings and child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine and nicotine-containing e-liquids that are made or derived from tobacco and intended for human consumption.

Since 2009, the FDA has been given rights to regulate tobacco, including the power to require new and more effective warning labels on tobacco products, impose restrictions on tobacco advertising and promotions and require tobacco companies to disclose what is in their products.

In response to FDA's actions regarding new warning labels, the American Vaping Association said that the agency is laying the groundwork for future regulations before the deeming regulations have been finalised.

"Since 2009, the FDA has been given rights to regulate tobacco, including the power to require new and more effective warning labels."

American Vaping Association president Gregory Conley said: "Child-resistant packaging is already in use by the vast majority of e-liquid manufacturers. Measures should be taken to keep all nicotine-containing products, including pharmaceutical products like the nicotine gum, out of the hands of children.

"Poorly designed warning labels have the capacity to mislead adult smokers on the relative risks of vaping versus tobacco smoking.

"Any proposed warning must be thoroughly tested to ensure that it only imparts factual information."

In March, FDA issued new rules, under which changing background colour of an existing product from green to red, changing its logo or adding words such as 'premium tobacco' will make it a new product requiring agency approval.