Kenmare to promote Metabolix’s compostable film grade

12 December 2012 (Last Updated December 12th, 2012 18:30)

Bioscience company Metabolix has signed an agreement with Kenmare, a packaging solutions supplier in Milan, Italy and Lugano, Switzerland.

Bioscience company Metabolix has signed an agreement with Kenmare, a packaging solutions supplier in Milan, Italy and Lugano, Switzerland.

As part of the agreement, Kenmare will promote Metabolix's certified-compostable film grade Mvera B5008 to its customers in 2013.

Mvera B5008, which serves as an alternative raw material for compostable bag production, has been certified by Vinçotte to meet the EN 13432 standard for compostable plastics.

Kenmare director Francesco Tognato said it has become important for bag suppliers and retail stores to offer more sustainable product options, owing to growing concern about single-use bags and the emergence of plastic bag laws requiring either reusable or certified compostable alternatives.

"We look forward to expanding our business with Metabolix next year as they ramp up their production in Europe," Tognato said.

According to Metabolix, the material has been designed for consumer compost bags, can liners for commercial compostable food waste and shopping and retail bags that can be reused as consumer compost bags.

The product features performance qualities such as puncture and tear resistance, better barrier properties, printability and compatibility with other compostable polymers, which are also exhibited by the existing non-compostable plastic bags.

By working with Kenmare, Metabolix aims to build awareness and generate additional sales for Mvera B5008 among Kenmare's customers.

Metabolix director of business development, Europe Dr Stan Haftka said, "This expanded relationship reflects Metabolix's continued growth in European markets and will help us leverage existing Kenmare customer relationships and capabilities to broaden our presence in European markets."

Metabolix is developing and commercialising Mirel and Mvera bioplastics, which serve as biobased and biodegradable alternatives to many petroleum-based plastics.