BASF and Avantium form joint venture to produce FDCA for packaging sector

10 October 2016 (Last Updated October 10th, 2016 18:30)

Germany-based BASF and Netherlands-based Avantium have established a new joint venture (JV) company, Synvina, to produce and market furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA).

Germany-based BASF and Netherlands-based Avantium have established a new joint venture (JV) company, Synvina, to produce and market furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA).

The JV will use Avantium’s YXY process to produce FDCA, which is made from renewable resources and is used to produce polyethylenefuranoate (PEF), a polyester used in food and beverage packaging.

The JV is planning to build a reference plant with an annual capacity of up to 50,000t at BASF’s Verbund site in Antwerp, Belgium.

BASF intermediates division president Stefan Blank said: “With Synvina we’ll enter the promising business with FDCA and PEF and to support our customers in the various industries to create value.

“We strongly believe that the future belongs to these products based on renewable resources. They combine superior characteristics with a production process based on renewable feedstock.

“Synvina is an innovative, entrepreneurial and highly competent, young company with an excellent starting position from which to build a globally leading role in FDCA and PEF.”

"With Synvina we’ll enter the promising business with FDCA and PEF and to support our customers in the various industries to create value."

Apart from producing FDCA, Synvina aims to develop a complete supply chain for PEF as sustainable bio-based packaging material.

Working with Avantium’s existing partners, the JV will improve the development of PEF films for use in food packaging, electronics applications, industrial and medical packages.

Synvina will also work with Mitsui to develop PEF thin films and bottles in Japan. It also plans to continue development partnerships with The Coca-Cola Company, Danone, ALPLA and other companies on the Joint Development Platform for PEF bottles.

PEF provides better barrier properties against carbon dioxide and oxygen, and therefore offers a longer shelf-life than conventional plastic packaging.

The material can also be used for foil pouches, fibres for carpets and textiles, dairy products, still and sports drinks, alcoholic beverages, and personal and home care products.


Image: Synvina to build a new plant at BASF’s Verbund site in Antwerp, Belgium. Photo: courtesy of Avantium.