CarbonLITE to supply equipment for US PET recycling facility

8 June 2014 (Last Updated June 8th, 2014 18:30)

Bottle-grade post-consumer recycled polyethylene terephthalate (pcrPET) producer CarbonLITE Recycling has signed contracts with Amut for the supply of primary processing equipment to the company's new 200,000ft² plastic recycling plant located in Abilene, Texas, US.

Water Bottles

Bottle-grade post-consumer recycled polyethylene terephthalate (pcrPET) producer CarbonLITE Recycling has signed contracts with Amut for the supply of primary processing equipment to the company's new 200,000ft² plastic recycling plant located in Abilene, Texas, US.

The facility is similar to CarbonLITE's existing one in Riverside, California. It will have an annual capacity of around 100 million pounds of drinks bottles that are turned into PET pellets that can be used to produce new bottles.

CarbonLITE president Neville Browne said: "We have had a very important learning curve in Riverside that has played, and will continue to play, a critical role in both the design and implementation of our plans for Abilene."

Amut machinery and technology will be used by CarbonLITE in various steps that are involved in cleaning the PET bottle stream, starting with the DLB-60 model label removal technology. Prior to the wet grinding process, PET bottles will be cleaned using Amut's PW-180/5 high-friction bottle wash technology. The company will also supply its AX 150/5 hot-flake friction washing technology for the final cleaning of the PET flakes.

Erema North America's Prime technology will be used for food-grade purification and pelletising. The front-end, bale-opening and bottle-sorting of the plant will be built by Bulk Handling Systems.

Installation of the equipment is expected to take place in the fourth quarter of the year, while initial production is expected in the second quarter of 2015. The total investment in equipment and infrastructure is expected to be more than $60m.


Image: CarbonLITE's Abilene facility is expected to annually recycle around 100 million pounds of drinks bottles into PET pellets. Photo: courtesy of Keattikorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net.