ConAgra Foods eliminates BPA from cans in North America

2 August 2015 (Last Updated August 2nd, 2015 18:30)

ConAgra Foods has transitioned all of its manufacturing units in the US and Canada to adopt Bisphenol A (BPA)-free packaging for its products.

ConAgra Foods has transitioned all of its manufacturing units in the US and Canada to adopt Bisphenol A (BPA)-free packaging for its products.

The company started packaging some of its food products in non-BPA lined cans in 2010.

However, other products of the company required an alternative due to acidity or other characteristics. As a result, the company selected glass and metal packaging company Ardagh Group for the supply of non-BPA cans to ensure long life of such food products.

"Our ongoing commitment to consumers means that we constantly work to improve our packaging to assure quality and the overall experience."

Ardagh manufactured cans in new production facilities by employing advanced technologies that allow the use of different coating systems using polyester or acrylic materials that do not contain BPA.

The company will now package its canned foods made in the US and Canadian facilities in Ardagh's cans with non-BPA liners.

ConAgra Foods packaging and sustainable productivity vice-president Gail Tavill said: "Our ongoing commitment to consumers means that we constantly work to improve our packaging to assure quality and the overall experience."

The company, which is still importing BPA-lined cans into the US and Canada, plans to talk to the suppliers to convert to non-BPA liners by early next year.

ConAgra's canned items include Hunt's tomatoes, Reddi-wip whipped cream, RO*TEL tomatoes and green chilies, Van Camp's beans and Ranch Style Beans, among others.

BPA has been used for packaging food since 1960s and is a component in metal can coatings, which protect the food from coming in direct contact with metal surfaces.

When foods come in direct contact with any packaging material, a small measurable amount of the packaging material may migrate into the food content, thereby increasing the risk of health problems.