Dell to introduce green Newlight Technologies packaging

20 May 2014 (Last Updated May 20th, 2014 18:30)

Multinational computer company Dell will begin piloting new carbon-negative packaging using AirCarbon technology from Newlight Technologies.

Closed-Loop Recycling

Multinational computer company Dell will begin piloting new carbon-negative packaging using AirCarbon technology from Newlight Technologies.

The AirCarbon-based packaging is due for launch in autumn, and will be used for the packaging sleeves around new Dell Latitude series notebooks.

Part of the company's new sustainability initiatives, the scheme brings Dell closer to achieving its goal of using 100% sustainable packaging by 2020. Dell is piloting greener and less expensive packaging initially in the US, and plans to extend it globally for use in packaging as well as products.

AirCarbon is a plastic material made from air and greenhouse gases, unlikeother plastics that are developed from fossil fuels. It is verified as a carbon-negative material on a cradle-to-grave basis by Trucost in cooperation with NSF Sustainability.

Newlight Technologies CEO Mark Herrema said: "We commend Dell for being the first in the IT industry to introduce packaging that reverses the impact of climate change. Introducing greener packaging at a lower cost per unit than traditional oil-based plastics is good for the environment and Dell's bottom line."

Dell has also collaborated with Wistron GreenTech to use UL-Environment-certified closed-loop recycled plastics in the manufacturing of the Dell OptiPlex 3030 All-in-One desktop.

With plans to use the closed-loop approach as a blueprint for reusing metals and other materials, Dell further aims to accelerate its goal of using 50 million pounds of recycled-content plastic and other sustainable materials in its products by 2020. The company is reusing plastics already in circulation to minimise e-waste, save resources and cut down carbon emissions by 11%, compared with virgin plastics.


Image: Closed-loop plastics sustainable chain. Photo: courtesy of Dell.