Glass Packaging Forum allocates recycling grants

25 June 2014 (Last Updated June 25th, 2014 18:30)

The Glass Packaging Forum’s Public Place Recycling Scheme has allocated grants to increase recycling and reduce litter in high-traffic public places in New Zealand.

The Glass Packaging Forum's Public Place Recycling Scheme has allocated grants to increase recycling and reduce litter in high-traffic public places in New Zealand.

The voluntary Public Place Recycling Scheme sets out recovery targets for paper, plastic, cans and glass packaging consumed in public places. Grants of $46,000 have been provided to successful projects, which will result in 44 new recycling and waste bin installations at hospitals, secondary schools and shopping areas.

Companies funding the scheme include confectioners, fast food outlets, retailers and packaging companies.

Public Place Recycling Scheme manager Lyn Mayes said that applications were assessed against a range of criteria.

"Our aim is to work with industry, local government and community groups to increase the availability of recycling bins in communities that do not currently have recycling facilities, tourist locations, venues where a lot of people consume snack food and beverages; and around our beaches and waterways," Mayes added.

New recycling facilities will be introduced in the cafés and public place areas at Auckland DHB and Middlemore Hospital and support will be offered for a National Schools Project run by EERST which will trial recycling at five selected secondary schools around the country. Recycling facilities will also be launched at Southmall in Manurewa and a pilot public place recycling initiative will be in place in Levin working with Horowhenua District Council. Tauranga City Council will receive funding to support recycling at the AIMS middle school sports tournament in September.

EERST Trust chair Marty Hoffart said: "Thanks to financial assistance from the Public Place Recycling Scheme, our not-for-profit-organisation EERST has been able to provide several high schools around the country with permanent recycling bins for beverage containers."