Global company Melitta has launched new cone coffee filters packaging with two sustainable certifications, underlining its commitment to environmental stewardship.  

The brand’s new cone filter boxes are now made with 100% recycled paperboard. 

The transition is in line with the company’s partnership with American Forests to support eco-friendly decisions for the environment and future generations. 

Melitta has secured the Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI) certification and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification.  

The BPI certification verifies that Melitta cone coffee filters are made from materials compostable in industrial composting facilities.  

The FSC certification also guarantees that the paper in cone coffee filter comes from responsibly managed forests, supporting sustainable forestry practices that benefit ecosystems and local communities. 

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By GlobalData

Melitta sustainability director Donna Gray said: “As a brand dedicated to sustainability as one of our guiding values, we continue to innovate within our supply chain to align with stringent global standards set by organisations like the FSC and BPI. 

“Paired with corporate volunteerism and giving back through our partners, our commitment is to work towards the pursuit for better coffee and a better planet.” 

Melitta’s introduction of these sustainable certifications is part of its long-term dedication to eco-friendly practices and providing consumers with sustainable coffee experiences.  

Since 2017, the company powered its Cherry Hill, New Jersey coffee roasting facility with solar panels, which generate 563,385kW of clean energy, annually.