Stora Enso partners with start-up Sulapac to tackle plastic waste

23 May 2018 (Last Updated May 23rd, 2018 12:19)

Finnish firm Stora Enso has entered a joint development deal with Sulapac to accelerate the use of fully renewable, recyclable and biodegradable materials in packaging to fight plastic waste. 

Stora Enso partners with start-up Sulapac to tackle plastic waste
Sulapac’s fully biodegradable packaging materials made using renewable and sustainable sources. Credit: © Stora Enso.

Finnish firm Stora Enso has entered a joint development deal with Sulapac to accelerate the use of fully renewable, recyclable and biodegradable materials in packaging to fight plastic waste.

Under the partnership, Stora Enso will licence Sulapac’s materials and technology, and develop fully renewable caps and closures for liquid packages.

The partners will also develop food packaging and consumer electronics packaging. Sulapac makes fully biodegradable packaging materials using renewable and sustainable sources.

Stora Enso consumer board executive vice-president Annica Bresky said: “At Stora Enso, we believe that everything that’s made with fossil-based materials today can be made from a tree tomorrow. Our future growth comes from innovations in renewable materials.

“With our partners, such as Sulapac, we drive these innovations to create the packaging of the future.”

“We believe that everything that’s made with fossil-based materials today can be made from a tree tomorrow.”

The collaboration between the companies started last year through Stora Enso’s Accelerator programme.

As part of the Accelerator programme, the firms partnered with Aalto University and start-ups for innovation on renewable products.

Sulapac CEO Suvi Haimi said: “The world needs material solutions that are 100% biodegradable. Sulapac material has all the benefits of plastic yet it completely biodegrades without the issues of microplastic.

“With Stora Enso’s global expertise we can really speed up the global launch of our Sulapac material.”

Recently, Stora Enso introduced wood-based biocomposites, known as DuraSense, as a renewable alternative for plastics.