UK court rejects tobacco industry’s appeal against plain packaging

1 December 2016 (Last Updated December 1st, 2016 18:30)

The UK Appeal Court has rejected the latest attempt made by major tobacco companies to prevent the introduction of mandatory standardised packaging for cigarettes and hand-rolled tobacco across the country.

The UK Appeal Court has rejected the latest attempt made by major tobacco companies to prevent the introduction of mandatory standardised packaging for cigarettes and hand-rolled tobacco across the country.

The companies that appealed against the judgement, passed earlier in 2016, include British American Tobacco, Imperial Tobacco and Japan Tobacco International.

In May, a day before the regulations took effect, the High Court of England and Wales rejected the industry’s arguments.

UK public health and innovation minister Nicola Blackwood was quoted by The Guardian as saying: “Standardised packaging will help cut smoking rates and reduce suffering, disease and loss of life.

“We are pleased that this decision will help many people to lead longer and healthier lives.”

"Standardised packaging will help cut smoking rates and reduce suffering, disease and loss of life."

Tobacco companies can make an application to appeal against the decision by 9 December.

According to UK regulations, all cigarette packs sold in the country should be the same shape, size and colour.

They also state that 65% of the front and back surfaces of the packs should feature health warnings.

The UK is a party to the global treaty, WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which seeks to reduce the harm caused by tobacco.

It is one of five countries, aside from Australia, France, Ireland and Hungary, to mandate plain packaging of cigarettes packs.

Ireland is yet to push its regulations through parliament, while a further 13 countries are working towards new legislation.