UK urges people to opt for recyclable wrapping paper for Christmas season

13 December 2015 (Last Updated December 13th, 2015 18:30)

UK-based waste management companies have urged residents to reduce their waste disposals during the Christmas period by recycling and reusing wrapping paper.

UK-based waste management companies have urged residents to reduce their waste disposals during the Christmas period by recycling and reusing wrapping paper.

According to country estimates, around 227,000 miles of wrapping papers are thrown out during this festive season, which extends from Christmas to New Year.

Wastes also take more than one billion greetings cards into account, which accompanies the boxes and wrappings from the presents and toys thrown out into the bins.

"There's so much wrapping for sale that can't be recycled back."

According to leading waste management firm Business Waste, much of the waste end up in landfill.

The company advocates use of green packaging products for wrapping their gifts, and asks UK residents to use 100% paper in order to allow easy recycling.

Conventionally used Christmas wrapping papers pose to be an issue in the country as large amount of those has high plastic, glitter and foil contents.

Business Waste spokesman Mark Hall said: "Christmas is the time of year when we forget ourselves and let all our bad habits run riot. From over-eating and getting drunk in front of the Queen's Speech, to wasting food and packaging, we're all guilty in some way or another.

"There's so much wrapping for sale that can't be recycled back simply because while it looks great, it's a dead-end product that can only be thrown away or burned."

Business Waste suggests use of three sustainable packaging solutions during the festive season comprising recyclable wrapping paper, recycled wrapping paper, and reusable gift bags and boxes.

In order to help the consumers identify whether the wrapping paper is recyclable or not, the firm also seeks clearer labelling from companies and wants reduction in products that end up in landfill or energy recovery.