UK’s James Cropper develops new renewable moulded paper packaging product

6 September 2016 (Last Updated September 6th, 2016 18:30)

UK-based James Cropper 3D Products has unveiled a new, renewable and recyclable moulded paper packaging product, which is said to be a ‘sustainable alternative to plastic’.

UK-based James Cropper 3D Products has unveiled a new, renewable and recyclable moulded paper packaging product, which is said to be a ‘sustainable alternative to plastic’.

Made from renewable fibre, the new material can be used to pack personal care and e-retail items, giftware, consumer electronics and homeware products.

The solution is available in a variety of colours, and will provide value for brand owners, designers and other customers.

James Cropper 3D Products chief technology officer Patrick Willink said: “We know that if brands are to move beyond the need for plastic in packaging, sustainable alternatives have to add value and can’t compromise on colour, quality or performance.

"We have to open up new opportunities for design innovation so that the many challenges of replacing plastic can be overcome. Our moulded paper packaging is the first step in this next generation.

"We have to open up new opportunities for design innovation so that the many challenges of replacing plastic can be overcome."

“Paper has a timeless sense of quality that’s worlds away from the multisensory disappointments of plastic. Of course, moulded fibre products are in limited use already. But these products have nowhere near the versatility in colour and design that we are able to produce.

“The switch from using plastic to our moulded paper packaging can also be made with relative ease, which means it is really challenging plastic as the go-to product for packaging.”

The company said that the packaging's cure-in-the-mould production process enables high-quality embossing.

The process creates moulded packaging with even wall thickness, and allows holes to be created.


Image: James Cropper 3D Products’ new moulded packaging material. Photo: courtesy of James Cropper.