Zume and Solenis create PFAS replacement for food packaging
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Zume and Solenis create PFAS replacement for food packaging

13 Aug 2021 (Last Updated August 13th, 2021 09:20)

Zume will end the production of products containing PFAS at its packaging facility in California.

US-based food packaging company Zume has partnered with speciality chemicals producer Solenis to provide an alternative to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) for food packaging manufacturers.

Over the past nine months, the companies have engaged in ‘deep’ collaboration and research and development to help reduce the industry’s dependence on single-use plastics.

The partners have created a solution for premium moulded fibre products that is free of any PFAS.

Zume and Solenis have open-sourced the packaging technology and detailed the process of creating the moulded-fibre packaging solution on FreeFromPFAS.com.

The joint initiative aims to allow all packaging manufacturers to adopt the technique and eliminate harmful chemicals more quickly.

Zume CEO and chairman Alex Garden said: “Open-sourcing our PFA-free solution creates a path for brands across the world to remove plastics and harmful chemicals from their consumer packaging and single-use goods.

“Brands have made pledges to remove PFAS and this new launch will enable them to deliver on their promises.”

Solenis CEO John Panichella said: “Our goal is to encourage any manufacturer in the world to start using this technology as quickly as possible.

“Through this joint initiative with Zume, global brands can meet their commitments to eliminate the use of PFAS faster than ever before.”

In a separate development, Zume has announced that it will end the production of products containing PFAS at its California packaging facility with immediate effect.

The company will collaborate with its partners to make all its products PFA-free by the end of this year.

Dubbed ‘forever chemicals’, PFAS are used to coat paper and cardboard containers for fast food and to-go boxes.

The US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has linked the substances to various health issues, including decreased fertility and weakened immune system response.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced a ban on the use of PFAS in food-contact packaging from January 2024.